Forgotten Self by Rachel Carr

Seventeen year old Abigail has just finished her junior year of high school. Her relationship with her parents is distant, but she has a tight group of friends. Everything is pretty normal…except a little secret she’s kept from everyone about her cousin, Kelly. But even this secret – which Abby more or less brushes off – will pale in comparison to what she’s about to discover. A half-remembered car crash, a new boy at school, and an old friend with secrets of his own: Abigail’s entire life is about to be turned upside down when she finds out that not only are angels and demons real, but she’s a part of that world as well.

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About the Author: Rachel lives in western Montana with her boyfriend (Colin), her cat (Kibo), and two Holland Lops (Boo and Bessie). You can view her website (which links to her blogs and gives updated book/series info) at http://www.thatgirlinthatjacket.com 

Just Finished…Forgotten Self by Rachel Carr

Oh yes – it gets 5* 🙂 

 

Forgotten Self is a really good read. Although I’ve not read a huge amount of books in the YA Angel/Demon field – Hush Hush series, Katherine Pine’s After Eden (good) and a couple more I won’t mention as they were shockingly poor – I quite like them when they’re done well. Forgotten Self is done very well and of those I’ve read I would rate it as the best.

The story is a good length and I read it in a couple of days in two long-ish sittings. Even though it’s not a long book it is well-detailed; the ‘angelic’ world has a good depth to it, the explanations for which are delivered nicely throughout the book alongside Abby’s ‘real’ life. The characters are very well drawn, especially Abby, whose POV we read from. And although I tend to plump for one guy or another in a book, I found both Jonathan and Lucas appealing – there are some nice, subtle dynamics for romantics to enjoy without it being a straight ‘love triangle’.

In the first couple of chapters I was enjoying the scene setting with Abby’s life, school friends and her relationship with cousin Kelly. I thought the descriptions of spiritual experiences and Abby’s grief were captivating – then BAM! Chapter 3 hits and there’s a very curious car accident and you were sucked into a bigger mystery with Abby. From that point on I struggled to put the book down as the pace was kept up in a perfect rhythm of events and mystery solving.

I think to compare with something like Hush Hush, Forgotten Self is more sophisticated – although I like Hush Hush there are some things – like not being able to stay away from the good-looking but dangerous seeming boy that felt a little cliché. The delivery of the narrative in this is simply better. Abby’s character feels more genuine and likeable than Nora’s: she nicely sarcastic, reasonably pragmatic, but also real has teenager ‘moments’.

This book is really well-written, from description to dialogue and emotions there is little repetition of images (something I found has irritated me in some other YA books) and they are quite original whilst being easy to read.

For anyone thinking of trying a YA Angel book – forget about the New York Times Bestselling series, this is the first I’d be recommending to them J